Most people like things wet but definitely not during a hike in the mountains. From slippery trails to soggy socks, getting wet might just not be one’s idea of fun. And while keeping up-to-date with the weather forecast has proven advantageous, nature has its own playful tricks.

But before we admit defeat and put on our sulky faces, there are actually many ways to face the cold spells coolly. It just requires a little extra precaution. As they say, staying dry is easier than drying out.

1. Before ticking off you gear list, take care of its carrier — that is you and your backpack. Take time to do research (bahala’g masuko si Cynthia Villar) on how to protect yourself and your backpack from rain cheaply and quickly.

Make sure you have your rain cover. If you do not have waterproof jackets and pants, you can always opt for the cheaper rain poncho.

dav
Team Buwad!

2. Pack all your necessary gears into trash bags/dry bags — especially your gadgets. Sort your things into zip locks to keep them dry and organized.

IMG_20191028_071511.jpg
noob essentials 

3. Proper layering. Layered clothes allow you to easily respond to adverse and changing weather conditions. Also, they regulate your body temperature better.

Choose high-quality, wind-resistant and waterproof outfits. These should be breathable and comfortable. Wear long sleeves (drifit, wool or fleece) beneath your outer layer. You can also put on leggings or workout tights under your pants because they don’t restrict movement and are far more comfortable.

IMG_20191028_074703.jpg
(c) Zen Mountain Gear

4. Don’t go crazy-rich-hiker on me. No need to spend a lot on your clothes. Ukay-ukay (surplus or thrift shop) is always ready to the rescue. Aside from saving your money, you also get to help lessen capitalism’s impact with these hand-me-downs. 😁

1572219646629.jpg
Who says men don’t go to ukay-ukay?

5. Protect your extremities with warmers. For someone who has cold intolerance like me, you have to be sure to protect your hands, feet, ears, neck and head by wearing gloves, thermal socks, neck scarf and bonnet.

IMG_20191028_074746.jpg
Keep them warm!

6. Estimate how waterproof, breathable, light and comfortable your shoes are. Even the most expensive trekking shoes won’t keep your feet completely dry while you hike in extended rain — you are going to be soaked one way or another. Bring extra sandals just in case.

1572220114335.jpg
Get comfy!

7. Lean on poles. No matter how strong the grip of your shoes are, you will need a trekking pole. It is an added support on the ground and allows for more traction. With it, you can check the stability of wet or muddy trail before making your step.

IMG_20190317_101609-01.jpeg
Indeed very help-POLE!

8. Sleep on warm surface. Invest on insulation foam or sleeping pad. Wrap yourself like a lumpia (shanghai roll) with those sleeping bags. You can also bring emergency blankets if it gets too cold.

Also, make use of the famous adage: no man is an island. Use your body heat to your advantage. Share it with your friends or more than friends.

IMG_20191028_075006.jpg
SMS founder spotted!

9. Always hike with your amego, amega and most importantly, your omega! After a long hike — wet or dry — you’re gonna need it. Trust me. 😂

received_2008232239480728.jpeg
(c) CJ Estrada

10. Last but definitely not the least, have a good time. Keeping a positive attitude can make things bearable. Hike it forward. Own the wind and rain.

IMG_20190803_172817.jpg
(c) P30 ni Chiarra 😉

The state weather bureau has recently declared the onset of the northeast monsoon or “amihan” season here in the Philippines. This entry is a personal list I made for my friends and I. Before the year comes to a close, we decided to do one last major climb. And what better way to cap the year than to climb the country’s highest?