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DoodleScribbles

Scribblings and scrawls of a hopeless romantic soul

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Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Iron and Ironies

Today we are surrounded by man and his creations. Man is inescapable, everywhere on the globe, and nature is a fantasy, a dream of the past, long gone.

Michael Crichton, Congo

My first foray into the written world of Michael Crichton was Congo. James, who loves the man as much as Dan Brown, never missed to mention his works whenever we talk about books. So I guess this is where curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back comes in.

The 1980 sci-fi novel centers on an expedition searching for rare blue diamonds and investigating the mysterious deaths of a previous expedition in the dense tropical rainforest of the Congo. At first I was worried that I’d be stuck in the complicated science and technical jargon but as it turns out, Crichton is a great de-jargonizer. I found myself immediately engaged in the story that capsulized science, history, and geography in each and every page.

Which brings me to this week’s WQW, Iron and Ironies. Congo left me emotionally, mentally and morally disturbed. In a simple story it raised provocative questions that I found hard to answer.

To what extent is animal cruelty? Is it limited to performing experiments/animal research? How about throwing lobsters on a boiling pot? Sticking pigs on bamboo poles? Exterminating rats? Do ALL animals have rights or just a selected few? Does man get to give them the reason to stay alive as a species?

These questions led me to reflect on our deeply ingrained habit of meat eating, on the equality among animals, and man’s idea of speciesism. I know there are multiple sides to these multifaceted issues and I would love to hear a thing or two from you. 🙂

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Writer’s Quote Wednesday – We need to be bothered

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There is, I assume most of you would agree, a long list of reasons why physical copies of books are better than their eBook counterparts. However, not everyone can bare the temptation for too long. A peak at a sentence that reads, IT WAS A PLEASURE TO BURN, could lead you to the very last page. And that’s what happened. I read Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 online.

This classic dystopia will take you to a time when books are banned and burned. In Guy Montag’s world, lives are dominated by televisions and literature is on the brink of extinction. Books and freethinkers are burned without a second thought. The storyline is good enough that it could stir the minds of many, but perhaps I was looking for more. More hard-hitting satire, more stimulation. Maybe a stronger revolt.

Nonetheless, it’s still a commendable piece of writing. This quote, for one, is very timely.

“We need not to be let alone. We need to be really bothered once in a while. How long is it since you were really bothered? About something important, about something real?”

Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

With all the happenings in different corners of the world — be it political, moral or environmental concerns — we really need to be bothered.

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – I have a question

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Or, rather, Lelouch does:

“What do you do when there is an evil you cannot defeat by just means? Do you stain your hands with evil to destroy evil? Or do you remain steadfastly just and righteous even if it means surrendering to evil?”

Lelouch Vi Britannia

In the vein of last week’s WQW entry, Are there any questions?, here I am throwing yet another inquiry.

Just recently, I was thrown into an alternate world where a philosophical and moral battle strongly exist. The quote above is taken from the Japanese anime, Code Geass. I’ve heard of the series years ago but I never had the drive to watch it. James successfully lured me into the anime this time. No regrets. 😀

The story revolves around the Empire of Britannia who conquered Japan and now call it Area 11. Its residents lost their rights to self-govern and are now called Elevens. The Empire uses destructive robotic weapons called Knightmares to ensure control, but someone is about to stand up against it. Lelouch Lamperouge, a Britannian student, seeks to use the power of the Geass to build a world based on his ideals. Unfortunately he finds himself caught in a crossfire between the Britannian and the Area 11 rebel armed forces.

Back to the question, I have this weird feeling inside that has been weighing me down. As an INFP whose choices and decisions are tethered on emotion and idealism, I find it hard to agree with Lelouch’s ways. For him, the ends justify the means. This just doesn’t go right with me. However, by the end of the series, I felt like loosening up to his approach. It’s a dilemma still. Can’t one just remain righteous and destroy evil instead?

Writers Quote Wednesday: Are there any questions?

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Are there any questions?

To some, this might just be an ordinary statement of inquiry. But to those who have read Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, these four words carry too much weight.

Originally published in 1985, Atwood’s dystopian novel takes readers to the fictional Republic of Gilead. It follows Offred, a Handmaid assigned to a high-ranking commander and his wife. In an age of declining births, Handmaids are valued only for their capability to procreate. They are held prisoners — stripped off their past and future. They are forbidden to read, write, or interact with the outside world. They are meant only to bear children for their assigned commander and failure to do so warrants death.

The book ends with Professor Pieixoto’s final line, Are there any questions? To me this seems a rhetorical question asked not to get an answer but instead to emphasize a point. It forces us to question our role as witnesses, both of Offred’s tale and of our own history of oppression.

Do we forget and stay silent? Do we remain neutral and indifferent? Do we stand up and fight?

There is more than one kind of freedom,” said Aunt Lydia. “Freedom to and freedom from. In the days of anarchy, it was freedom to. Now you are being given freedom from. Don’t underrate it.

Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale

You! Yes, you. As The Handmaid’s Tale becomes grimly relevant these days, would you ask a question?

Writers Quote Wednesday: Goodbyes

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Have you ever been through a lot of goodbyes that you eventually become too good at it?

However poetically beautiful goodbyes may be, most of us here prefer the opposite. Nobody wants the dreaded separation from a fond moment or a person— for a while or for good.

I haven’t been through a lot of goodbyes (and I would like to keep it that way) but I think I’ve been through a number of unsaid ones. Those silent goodbyes that likens to letting go of a hand that you never held. Like the setting free of someone or something that wasn’t yours in the first place. You see, I learn my lessons slow and I’m only good at one sigh at a time.

Maybe this is why I’ve been replaying this certain song lately. Too Good at Goodbyes is a single by English singer-songwriter, Sam Smith, who has been away from the limelight for two years. The song just shoves depths of melancholy. It’s sad and hopeful intertwined.

Hope you enjoy it. 🙂

And every time you hurt me, the less that I cry
And every time you leave me, the quicker these tears dry
And every time you walk out, the less I love you
Baby, we don’t stand a chance, it’s sad but it’s true
I’m way too good at goodbyes

 

Writers Quote Wednesday: Freedom

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Last night, I finally finished reading Rabindranath Tagore’s The Home and the World. I’ve had this book for weeks but didn’t want to rush it to end. It was much more than a classic literary masterpiece to me. Each page was an awakening about the fragility of humanity. Each POV from the three central characters brought me to their shoes. I struggled with Nikhil in keeping his morals, I lost my way to sensationalism and terror with Bimala, and I breathed in Sandip’s clouded fanaticism.

This book resonated deeply, especially with what is happening to my country, the Philippines, and to the rest of the world. What is true freedom? How can we truly heal? Here’s an excerpt from the book that hits home:

“Is there any country, sir,” pursued the history student, “where submission to Government is not due to fear?” “The freedom that exists in any country,” I replied, “may be measured by the extent of this reign of fear. Where its threat is confined to those who would hurt or plunder, there the Government may claim to have freed man from the violence of man. But if fear is to regulate how people are to dress, where they shall trade, or what they must eat, then is man’s freedom of will utterly ignored, and manhood destroyed at the root.”

― Rabindranath TagoreThe Home and the World

And to anyone who hasn’t read it yet, I definitely recommend The Home and the World.  ❤ #makelovenotwar

Writers Quote Wednesday: Genius

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Genius. Who? Not me.

Today I would like us to celebrate the greatest, the genius Charles Bukowski. Bukowski is a German-American poet, novelist, and short story writer whose works are depictions of the downtrodden American social, cultural, and economic life. Known for his satiric and sometimes vulgar remarks, he has caught the interest of many (including me) with his crisp and clever style of writing.

I have read and re-read his poems but one can never get enough of them. He has a way of bringing poetry to the streets, to the masses. He is smart and mad intertwined. And much more. I’ve always wanted to follow  his style. To  say profound things in simple ways. But as of this time, it’s a work in progress.

“Genius might be the ability to say a profound thing in a simple way.”

― Charles Bukowski

How about you? What’s your writing style?

Happiest birthday, Bukowski!! ❤

Writers Quote Wednesday: Are You a Poet?

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Yes, I’d be happy say that I am. 😊

Dropping in for a quick sip of hot mochachino at Go Dog Go Café, D of Inside the Mind of Davy D, asks us this all-time high question.

I remember having this conversation before (right, D?) and my opinion remains unchanged. I still believe that the title “poet” can be claimed as much as it can be bestowed. Those great poets that we look up to started off as beginners, writing and re-writing their hearts out, until their words made its mark. They were romantics and they were mad before they were labeled poets. Same goes for most of us here. I think it all boils down to the heart of of the person who claims to be one. So long as poetry plays a big part in our lives, so long as it runs in our bloodlines— regardless if it’s an excellent piece or a work in progress (I refuse to call them bad poems), infamous or not, published or simply etched on a crumpled paper— then by all means let’s call ourselves poets.

And since this originally was a post for WQW, here’s a quote I found from the 1989 movie, Dead Poets Society, which pinpoints the core of a poet’s heart. Passion.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

-John Keating, Dead Poets Society

So long as there is passion, this world will never run out of poets. Would you agree?

Have a lovely day, everyone. 💕

Writers Quote Wednesday: A Start Of Something New

 

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Good morning, citizens of blogosphere! I would like to welcome you all the newest addition to my blog, the Writer’s Quote Wednesday. I have finally decided to join my dear friend, Jade of Jade M. Wong in shining the spotlight onto our chosen poet or writer every Wednesday (Thursday on my side of the earth).  I hope you will like their work too! 🙂

I have heard so much about You
that should make me stay away from You
but I just couldn’t help myself
I got to close and the mere scent of You enchanted me

Charles Robert Lindholm, Sinfully Delicious

As for my first guest, I am happy to introduce a dear friend of mine who pens about love and romance, and everything in between. Lately my muse and I have been through a series of hiatus and it was his poems that nudged the hopeless romantic in me. Twice. Meet the man behind The Reluctant Poet, Chuck.

It all started with a simple conversation about chocolates and love when his poem, Chocolate To Me, prompted me to write my own, An Inch Closer: The Sins We Make. One lead to another and here he is, writing about one’s addiction to chocolate… and love.

Give him a visit and you’re up for two bags of Hershey’s chocolate covered with caramel kisses! 😉

 

 

 

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